Tag: Cara’s mango

How to slice a mango

Our mango tree has gone a little nuts this year. When we purchased our house 11 years ago we planted what we thought was a dwarf mango. The landscaper was mistaken. The tree is as tall as our neighbor’s two-storey house. For years it’s teased us with a just a handful of mangos. When I say handful, I am joking. One fits in my hand.

We have a Hayden tree. These mangos are breakfast candy. They are large, they are sweet, they are…. amazing. Mangos grow seasonally. Our tree begins flowering in February. The fruit begin ripening late July and will continue to ripen through October. Thankfully they don’t all ripen at once! Most years I have carefully hoarded my harvest, freezing any excess for smoothies and baking. This year I’ve been sharing with neighbors and friends. I’ve also frozen many bags for off-season. Mango off-season, that is.

I was showing our youngest how to slice one this morning. Mom, you should make a Youtube video so I can watch it next time I need to cut one. Like your Tommy Bahama beach chair video! That video went ‘viral’ with currently 5700+ views. I won’t lie, I currently have fifteen subscribers and am definitely not a youtube sensation!

Anyway, challenge accepted. Here is my ‘How to slice a mango’ Youtube video for your viewing pleasure. I hope you enjoy! We filmed it at our Palms at Wailea #503 condo. Oh yeah – we got some new livingroom furniture…..

What to do with all these mangos?

What a problem to have! Besides eating them, enjoying them as a peanut butter sandwich….

This mango coffee cake was amazing with mango (I presume the peaches called for in the recipe would be great too).

Mango sorbet (blend 3 cups frozen mango chunks, 1/4 cup almond/coconut milk, 1/2 cup unsweetened pineapple juice for five minutes, then freeze). This is delicious. I think it would be even better in a cocktail!

Mango bread (substitute the bananas in banana bread)

How about you? What is your favorite treat?

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Hula Cookies

Have you ever been to Hula Cookies? Their store is located at the Harbor Shops in Maalaea Harbor.

Friends used to own a small jewelry store next door, so we would stop in at Hula Cookies from time to time. After yesterday’s Maui Ocean Center visit, my youngest and I stopped at Hula Cookies for one of their gourmet icecream sandwiches. While we got there before their shop opened, we got lucky! They have an icecream sandwich vending machine just outside the store! Perfect! We still got our treats and got to support this awesome small business.

As the name implies they have a number of different gourmet cookies that they bake and sell. They also serve Roselani icecream. You can build your own icecream sandwich with your choice of cookies and icecream. How sweet is that! My son chose chocolate chip cookies and mint chip icecream (of course). But I had my eye set on the Hula’s Delight cookies These have dried mango, dried pineapple, coconut and mac nuts. We ran the credit card and got my son’s icecream sandwich out of the vending machine ($7), then ran it again for mine. In my haste it appears I punched in the wrong number, instead of an icecream sandwich I got a baggie of 4 Hula’s Delight for $5. In my opinion, a total win.

Icecream – I can take it or leave it, but give me something I can sink my teeth into (like four hula cookies), and I’m a happy girl! Now, keep in mind, the vending machine is a freezer, so they were all frozen (since the icecream needs to be kept frozen). The cookies softened up quickly enough. It worked for us, but I think next time we’ll try to time our visit better so we can have soft cookies with the icecream. Yum.

Roselani Icecream

Roselani Icecream is Maui’s very own icecream. Maui Soda Works started manufacturing it in 1932, since then it is sold at all grocery stores in Hawaii. We recently tried the Kona Mud Pie. Oh it’s delicious.

Maui Harbor Shops

Have you stopped at the Harbor Shops in Maalaea? You may recognize their two main tenants – the Maui Ocean Center and the Pacific Whale Foundation. Do take a moment to check out the other shops and restaurants – did you know there are two levels? Tante’s has a gorgeous harbor view, Beach Bums is popular and runs regular radio ads. There are a few gift shops, a tattoo parlor, and Maui’s newest live entertainment venue, Da Playground.

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Lessons learned from my mango tree

In the past few years I’ve written a few blog entries about our mango tree. When we first bought our Kihei house ten years ago, we planted a dwarf mango tree. We were so excited to taste our first mango, but our tree had other ideas. We knew of course that it can take a few years for the tree to produce but…. the waiting was still hard.

A few things went wrong. For starters, the dwarf mango was no dwarf. It’s a a large mango tree that just keeps growing taller (infringing ‘just so slightly’ on our neighbor’s ocean view – oops). One year the mango tree objected to pruning and punished us the following year.

Lessons from my tree

I would like to start with a disclaimer – I am not a gardener. I have a pretty black thumb. Thankfully Sig does an amazing job with our landscaping, assisted by our teenaged lawnmowers.

The most surprising thing to me about our tree is that it blooms at least two months after all the other neighborhood mango trees are done blooming. I presume it’s a different variety.

Our mangos ripen at least two months after other mango trees in our area. This means I am drooling over everyone else’s mangos for two months until ours are finally ready. Fortunately I have a friend whose tree ripens in May. It is wonderful to have friends with mango trees!

Our tree’s fruit ripens over the course of several months. This year we picked our first mango in early August. Here it is October and we are still waiting for half our mangos to ripen. This is so different from my memories of apple harvesting as a child. The house I grew up in had some 20 apple and pear trees. They all seemed to ripen within a few weeks of another.

Mangos ripen most evenly when picked green. When allowed to ripen on the tree, our mangos ripen very unevenly. The bottom of the fruit will be overripe while the top is still rock hard. Today I went and picked three green mangos that are starting to soften. They are now quarantining in a paper bag on my lanai table – I don’t know why this works but it does.

Mangos grow in bunches. Generally on my tree, in any given bunch the lowest mango will ripen first.

Mangos that turn color are not necessarily ripe. In fact, we have beautifully yellow and orange mangos that are rock hard while green mangos are softening. When cut and peeled, they taste equally delicious. I don’t know why some of our mangos are colorful and some stay green even when ripe. From what I can tell, sun exposure does not make much of a difference.

Despite all the oddities of our mangos, they are amazing. I don’t know what the variety is called, but they taste very similar to Hayden mangos, though they are larger – 5-6 inches in length. We call them our breakfast candy.

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It’s Mango Season!

Have you ever had a juicy tree-ripened mango? Be sure to find one when you come to Maui!

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our mango tree

When we bought our house, we planted a dwarf mango tree. Somewhere along the line the tree forgot that it is a dwarf and has been growing like crazy. After its first five years in our yard, this year we have a deent crop of mangos. If only they were ripe.

For some reason our tree ripens about 2 months after others here in Kihei. However, the good news is that the mangos don’t all ripen at once but rather over a 3-4 month time period. Perfect! We have several months to enjoy our fruit.

Did you know, some people are allergic to mango skin? It has the same chemical compound as poison ivy. If this is you ~ I feel so sorry for you!

Since my mangos are far from ripe (it’ll be another month or two), I’ve sourced mangos from a friend. They are delicious. If you are in Kihei and would like some, I can tell you where to find them. He sells them for $2/fruit (cheaper than Yee’s which is $3.50/mango). Please, don’t buy your mangos at Costco or even the grocery store… treat yourself to a local-grown tree-ripened mango! You won’t regret it!

How to cut a mango

First set the mango on end. It is a narrow long pit so you cut parallel to the fruit.

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slicing into the mango

Cut alongside the pit on both sides.

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here I am holding the piece with the pit

Score each half of the mango, then push in at the center while pulling the edges down. You can either eat it like that, or slice the mango cubes off the peel.

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here you can see one half scored, the other half has been ‘pushed out’. In the back is the piece with the pit (cut the fruit around it)

Lucky me ~ I enjoyed this delicious breakfast candy this morning! Only two mangos left…

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My breakfast candy…

Our mango tree has been blessing us with about one ripe mango a week since July. Why is it still producing fruit four months after it started? I have no idea. It’s not like we’ve had that many mangoes to begin with, maybe 30 in all (the tree is just 5 years old). But we have been enjoying every single one (okay, we shared a few, but not many).

This afternoon I picked about 7 of them as they seem to be ripening more rapidly now. I am very curious to see if the tree will bloom again in February like it did this year. I know Sig has big plans for pruning it… I am dead-set against it. These mangoes have been amazing.

our home grown mangoes

Where is the best place to get mangoes? I would go to a farmers market and carefully sniff your way through them til you find some that smell mango-ey. That’s my rule of thumb with most fruit – if it doesn’t smell like the fruit should smell, why bother? Yee’s Mangoes on South Kihei Road (just a little North of Longs) has amazing mangoes – and you will pay accordingly, but they are the best.

How to cut a mango? I wrote about that a few months ago – check it out (with pictures). It’s super easy!

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